DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS

CRIME

THRILLER

Cobb

SYNOPSIS

Created and Written by Beau Smith. Art by Eduardo Barreto.

If Chuck Norris and Jackie Chan had a baby, his name would be Cobb (created by Beau Smith)—a loose cannon, former secret service agent, and kick-asser of bullies everywhere.

After a stint as a Level-One Secret Agent to the President of the United States, Frank Cobb enjoys retirement by staying off the grid while roaming the country. But his destructive do-gooder attitude catches up with him when local police lock him up for assault… against five men. The five men’s crime? Kicking a stray dog.

All seems fairly hopeful for Cobb, when Jim, Assistant Director of Security for Uncle Sam, bails him out with the heavily weighted suggestion that Cobb work for his former mentor, Jack “Murph” Murphy, at his private securities and investigation operation in Manhattan. Without a lot of options, Cobb begrudgingly accepts.

Cobb’s first day turns into a trial by fire when bombshell Nikita Melnikov—former lover to the Russian mafia boss, Yuri Ivankov—bursts into Murph’s office, pleading for protection. When Nikita witnessed Yuri’s involvement in an arms deal with terrorists, the mafia boss put a hit out on her. All hell breaks loose when Cobb and Murph realize Yuri’s lackeys followed Nikita to their office. Cobb takes down most of them, smashing their hands and stealing their weapons one-by-one, but Molly Murphy—law student and granddaughter to Jack—gets kidnapped in the scuffle.

Yuri arranges to exchange Molly’s life for Nikita’s, and hires former KGB agents Agron “The Cossack” Rostov (a beast with skills equal to Cobb) and Natasha Badenov (a deadly assassin who has never been caught) to ensure the exchange goes smoothly. But Cobb and Murph are already infiltrating Yuri’s home and Molly didn’t spend her summers training in Quantico for nothing. With the terrorists arriving to finalize their weapons purchase, it’s guaranteed to be a mess.

But the thing about Cobb is, he doesn’t give up. Not when all the chips are down, not when he’s holding a deuce and seven. If winning the long-shot pot means doing the right thing, he goes all in.